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Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

David Ignatius
Associate Editor and Columnist for the Washington Post
MSNBCW 06/08/2014
Ignatius: Last week I went to interview the Director of National intelligence, James Clapper. He doesn't give interviews very often. And in that conversation, he said that the damage done by Snowden's revelations is less than the intelligence community initially had thought. That in his words, some of the things we thought he took, he didn't. Some of the things he tried to take, he wasn't able to. He said also, I should note, that in his view, the damage caused even though less than expected was still in his words profound.
David Ignatius
Associate Editor and Columnist for the Washington Post
MSNBCW 06/08/2014
Ignatius: A senior intelligence official familiar with this matter broke down what they think Snowden has taken. 300 documents that have been published in newspapers around the world so far, another 200,000 that are believed to have been given by Snowden to journalists and then an additional 1.5 million that they believe that he accessed. That may sound like an awful lot. But it's fewer than they thought. They thought it was more than that.
David Ignatius
Associate Editor and Columnist for the Washington Post
MSNBCW 06/08/2014
Ignatius: some damage they know about, just by observing our adversaries, by looking at al Qaeda and other terrorist groups which have, according to officials, changed the way they operate in this year since Snowden's revelations, showed them some of the things the United States was capable of doing. There are other things they don't want to talk about. For example, I pushed officials, do you see any change in Russian or Chinese behavior that would suggest that they have become aware of certain secret things we're doing? They just wouldn't answer that question. So I can't tell your viewers what that one is.
Bob Goodlatte
Representative (R-VA), Chairman, House Judiciary Committee
CSPAN3 06/13/2014
Goodlatte: As we all know, last week marked the one-year anniversary of the first leak of classified material by Edward Snowden, a criminal betrayal of his country and arguably the most significant leak in U.S. history. Over the past year, the House Judiciary Committee conducted aggressive oversight of the NSA bulk collection program and spearheaded house passage of the USA Freedom Act. This bipartisan legislation reforms controversial national security programs and provides expanded oversight and transparency of America's intelligence gathering. Although the leaks by Edward Snowden may have been the impetus for congressional reforms, the passage of this bipartisan legislation in no way condones or excuses his actions. The detrimental consequences of what he did may not yet be fully realized.
Raul Labrador
Representative (R-ID)
CSPAN3 06/13/2014
Labrador: Now severe abuses of this program have actually come to light, including NSA analysts listening to overseas calls of U.S. soldiers to their girlfriends and wives in the states. But when the wiretapping was challenged the solicitor general promised the Supreme Court that if any of the info was ever used in a court, the defendant would be notified. But last year Reuters report found that DOJ officials are using NSA gathered intelligence as leads for criminal cases without informing the defendant of the origin of the case and misleading federal prosecutors about it’s origins. Do you believe that such use of NSA intercepts are lawful? Comey: That's a complicated question, one I'm trying to parse to make sure I don't talk about anything classified in an open setting.
James Comey
Director of the FBI
CSPAN3 06/13/2014
Comey: …the way in which we interact with information collected by the NSA or by the FBI is entirely lawful and I also understand -- I don't know the history you're talking about well enough to comment but that it is now the practice where someone is notified in the circumstances you talked about. Labrador: Well the reports are that they’re supposed to be notified and in some cases they have not been notified. Would you investigate any of these allegations if it's true that some of these people were not notified? Comey: Whether it would be FBI jurisdiction to investigate it. I suspect there’s an inspector general who would have jurisdiction to investigate it. That’s probably the most I can say based on what I know from your question. Labrador: Okay, maybe we should have a conversation about this. I think that his is an area of concern that some of us have about the NSA. I think there's been some abuses and obviously we are all concerned about (fourth amendment protections.)
Thomas Massie
Representative (R-KY)
CSPAN 06/19/2014
Massie: American people are sick of being spied on. Our founding fathers wrote an important provision into the Bill of Rights for the fourth amendment. And that requires probable cause and a warrant before the government and government agents can snoop on any American. During the debate on the U.S.A. Freedom Act we knew that more work was needed to ensure Americans’ privacy rights were protected. That’s why our bi-partisan group has joined together to shut surveillance back doors that do not meet the expectations of our constituents or the standards required set by the Constitution.
Zoe Lofgren
Representative (D-CA) member, House Judiciary Committee
CSPAN 06/19/2014
Lofgren: Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I think it's important to know that the Director of National Intelligence has confirmed publicly that the government searches vast amounts of data, including the content of emails and telephone calls without individualized suspicion or proximate cause when it comes to U.S. persons. Last week the director of the F.B.I. testified under oath before the judiciary committee that this information is used for prosecution and without a warrant.
Zoe Lofgren
Representative (D-CA) member, House Judiciary Committee
CSPAN 06/19/2014
Lofgren: This amendment is simple. It allows us to get the bad guys but it also says use probable cause and the fourth amendment. It also closes a back door to a, technology holes. The broad support for this, I think, shows why it's important for Mr. Sensenbrenner of Wisconsin, myself, Mr. Conyers of Michigan, Mr. Poe of Texas, Ms. Gabbert, Mr. Jordan of Ohio, Mr. O'Rourke, Mr. Amash, Mr. Massie, Mr. Holt, Mr. Nadler, Mr. Petri, Mr. Delbene, Mr. Farenthold, Mr. Sanford, Mr. Butterfield, this is all over this house of representatives, right to left, saying, yes, we need to protect our country but we also need to honor our constitution and especially the fourth amendment.
Dutch Ruppersberger
U.S. Representative D-Maryland, Ranking Member on the Intelligence Committee
CSPAN 06/19/2014
Ruppersberger: now we have an amendment to an appropriations bill that makes major legislative changes to FISA with only 10 minutes of debate and it make s ours country less safe. It would prohibit the urgent search of lawfully collected information, to thwart a bomb threat against a synagogue in Los Angeles, a church in Maryland or a New York Stock Exchange. There's no emergency exceptions and it basically says that what you can do to stop a criminal in this country, you can't do to stop a terrorist and that is wrong. We can not allow this to happen. We will continue to work on FISA and other national security laws to maximize privacy and civil liberties especially for U.S. persons but we must do so carefully and deliberately. We must make sure to also keep our country and our allies safe from terrorist attacks. Ultimately, while I applaud these members for continuing to look for ways to reform our intelligence laws, we shouldn't be doing this on an appropriations bill with only 10 minutes of debate.
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